T W G : Design Journal

Paul’s FOG Favorites

Earlier this month, I had the honor of attending the 4th annual FOG DESIGN + ART fair at Fort Mason in San Francisco. It was a true delight to be in attendance alongside the work of some of the 20th and 21st Century's most influential artists and designers.

 Paul Wiseman admires artwork from  Holster Burrows Gallery

Paul Wiseman admires artwork from Holster Burrows Gallery

One of the highlights was the textured wall art featured at London’s Carpenter Workshop Gallery. This patterned gouged wood wall art is at once dramatic and understated.

  Paul Wiseman posing next to the gouged wood wall art

 Paul Wiseman posing next to the gouged wood wall art

Another favorite was Gagosian Gallery’s outstanding collection of works on paper by American Abstract Expressionist Helen Frankenthaler, who pioneered the Color Field movement. These vibrant pieces demonstrate her true mastery of color and form.

 TWG Design Principal James Hunter admires Gagosian Gallery’s collection of works by Helen Frakenthaler

TWG Design Principal James Hunter admires Gagosian Gallery’s collection of works by Helen Frakenthaler

I can’t go without mentioning Joel Shapiro's minimalist steel figure sculpture that appeared as if it were jumping off of its pedestal. Presented by Pace Gallery, this artist is particularly dear to me as we recently included his work in a client’s Northern California residence designed by architect William Wurster.

 Joel Shapiro at Pace Gallery

Joel Shapiro at Pace Gallery

Finally, the pièce de resistance was without a doubt the glorious 21POP installation that greeted me as I entered and exited the pavilion. Designed by FOG committee member Stanlee R. Gatti, the installation consisted of a vibrant rug-like patterns made out of 200,000 real roses. The result is a graphic, ephemeral art piece that perfectly marries art, nature, and design.

 A look at Stanlee R. Gatti’s 21POP installation

A look at Stanlee R. Gatti’s 21POP installation

There were far too many inspired exhibits to name them all, but when I left Fort Mason last week, I not only felt revived by the visual splendor, but also a sense of pride. San Francisco, once a refuge to emerging artists looking to escape New York City, has since risen to the forefront of art and design. And for that, I couldn’t be more grateful.